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Voodoo-Tiki

Sep 19 '14
I feel your pain.

I feel your pain.

Sep 19 '14

mlp-merch:

Even more Cutie Mark Magic ponies! Now it’s the upcoming CMM line of POP ponies, including Spitfire, Princess Cadance, Fluttershy, Applejack, Pinkie Pie and Rarity! Check out all information and way more images in our full article: http://www.mlpmerch.com/2014/09/new-pop-pony-images-found-cadance.html

I don’t care for the symbols all over them because it looks random and sloppy, but those wings are very cute. I hope they’re fairly sturdy, though, so kids can take them on and off often and not get their heart broken if they snap.

Sep 19 '14

pembrokewkorgi:

literatedead:

The Mane Six and their dolls series by uotapo

Too adorable for words…

Sep 19 '14

princessmoondust:

Group of Fakies, “Pony” found at Toys R’ Us. They are all pegasi, and all have the same heart shape cutie mark. They look pretty similar to g3 so I was tempted to buy.

The blue pony has the nicest face. Have you guys ever seen “Pony”?

Those DO look nice! I would have snagged the purple one for sure.

Sep 19 '14

bad-mushroom:

questionableliterarymerit:

zvcruvolo:

He just shit on your whole life, bitch.

Can we talk about this for a sec?

This exchange was really important to me because I think Nina’s attitude here illustrates a HUGE problem with modern pop culture criticism.

Feedback regarding any work should always be delivered in a constructive way. The goal of any kind of evaluation is to point out what went right, what went wrong, and do so objectively, without bias, so that the recipient can improve himself/herself. Ideally, there should be no prejudice and (to a certain degree) no emotional attachment to the work being evaluated. 

While the aesthetic value of a creative work is most certainly subjective, and the passions it evokes can also vary from person to person, the expression of a critic’s reaction to a work should be divorced from the emotional response he or she first received from that work so that the work can be examined within larger context, one extending beyond the scope of the individual person. 

Reality TV has encouraged a style of criticism that rewards short-sighted snark and imprecise hyperbole over substantive commentary and fair-handedness. I’m thinking about Gordon Ramsey-style emotional outbursts where there’s cursing or violent shouting. I’m thinking about nasty rounds of Simon Cowell-brand sarcasm, where cute quips and degrading put downs become more important than delivering truly accurate, well-rounded criticism. I’m thinking about those judges who just scream and shout or clap their hands wildly or dance or throw out tired variations of “you killed it” or “that was the bomb” without really providing examples that illustrate what choices the artist made that were truly distinctive or superior. And frequently, when judges DO offer well-rounded criticism, they usually get booed for it by the audience even when it’s polite and accurate (I’m looking at YOU, Dancing with The Stars audience members!!!)

There’s no need for cruelty when providing a negative evaluation. And a positive evaluation needs more than exuberant gushing to be helpful. Both these styles lend themselves to emotional exhibitions that lack real, critical content. They may be better for TV ratings, but I think they also diminish the art of criticism. They perpetuate a culture where people listen to those individuals who are shouting the loudest, not those who might have the best ideas or clearer insights. It’s true that sometimes a pithy piece of snark can be insightful or clever, but most TV judges are a far freaking cry from Oscar Wilde!

In Nina Garcia’s case, she had her chance at express her scathing criticism in this clip, but she was so hell-bent on being as devastating as possible in her delivery that she could not even accept a humble “thank you” from this PR designer.

I don’t know what was going through Chris’ mind during this evaluation, but I believe his reply was meant as a subdued form of polite acceptance for Nina’s criticism. Even though Nina gave him this elaborate negative comment, he still respects her enough as a professional to take what she is saying constructively (even though it was never offered in the spirit of edification). 

Nina doesn’t like his graciousness! She goes out of her way to make sure he feels insulted: ”That’s not a compliment.”

Chris responds with a curt, clarifying reply:

"I didn’t take it as a compliment."

Now THAT is my favorite kind of smackdown. It’s understated, subtle, humble, and completely turns the tables on the person who is supposed to have all the power.

I don’t know about other viewers, but after this interaction I was left with the distinct impression that it was not Chris’ understanding of Nina’s criticism that was lacking, but instead it is Nina’s authority as a critic that suddenly became questionable (at least in this one exchange). 

image

Work it, Chris!

#3257024 why questionableliterarymerit is awesome <3

Very well said. It wasn’t until I was in a college creative writing class that I had this explained to me - that it’s perfectly OK to dislike something if you can clearly express why, and then suggest how you think it can be improved. And it’s polite to point out the things you do think succeeded. I guess people just think it’s more amusing to be over the top and colorful when they blast something, which is why I don’t watch critique videos any more (and kind of want to do some of my own, except I’m very camera shy). 

(Source: )

395,092 notes (via oak23 & )
Sep 19 '14
unclefather:

ibebro:

unclefather:

i’m so old

it was actually 14 years ago, you are not with math

you’re not with math either

unclefather:

ibebro:

unclefather:

i’m so old

it was actually 14 years ago, you are not with math

you’re not with math either

(Source: safe-net)

Sep 19 '14

tranxious:

If the idea that “they is plural” ever bothers you, just imagine that there’s several of me and we’re all screaming at you to use my correct fucking pronouns

Sep 19 '14
Best part :)

Best part :)

Sep 18 '14
soulcookiesco:

This was such a fun commission to do! My commissions are open, message me here or email me at tiella@soulcookies.org. #mylittlepony #leaper #customs #resin #cute #unicorn #Framatic

Super cute!

soulcookiesco:

This was such a fun commission to do! My commissions are open, message me here or email me at tiella@soulcookies.org. #mylittlepony #leaper #customs #resin #cute #unicorn #Framatic

Super cute!

Sep 18 '14

kayathedragon:

aganami:

This isn’t right. You’re supposed to be with me!

The actual definition of what some guys think when the girl says “no”.

"OMG I did this and that for YOU, you must date me!"

Hell no. If I don’t like you, I won’t date you.

This movie is fucking golden.

YES CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS MOVIE

Megamind has the ultimate example of a “nice guy”, Hal, who liked Roxanne - and he was clear about it. He “complimented” several things to her in the beginning, which guess what - were not flattering at all, but downright creepy, so really, it was no wonder Roxanne didn’t like him.

But after he gets his superpowers, he expects her to - he expects to be rewarded for being the “good guy”, despite the fact that he hasn’t really done anything for her. When she rejects him and later finds out that she had dated Megamind for a time, he’s furious that she would date the “bad guy” when he is the “good guy”.

Yet despite Megamind being “bad” and Hal being “good”, it’s Megamind who respects what she wants - when she told him to back off, he backed off, and then later apologized, while Hal was legit going to kill her for rejecting him. So really, who is the good guy?

I was kind of surprised this movie doesn’t get more love - I put off watching it because I don’t like Will Ferrell much, but when I did I was very pleasantly surprised by the plot.